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Flights to St. Louis

About Destination

St. Louis, the largest city in Missouri, lies just below the junction of the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, which here forms the boundary between Missouri and Illinois. The city has long been known as the "Gateway to the West" because it was from here that the Europeans set out to conquer the Wild West. It is home to St. Louis University, the oldest university west of the Mississippi, which was founded in 1818. The city's connection with Scott Joplin, "the father of Ragtime," ensures its fame as a music city.

ATTRACTIONS TO VISIT IN St. Louis

1. Gateway Arch

In the center of Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Park is the Gateway Arch, a symbol of the city's role as the "Gateway to the West." This parabolic arch of stainless steel, 625 feet high, was erected from 1959 to 1965 to the design of Eero Saarinen, based on an unexecuted project by Adalberto Libera for the entrance to the Esposizione Universale di Roma of 1942. Eight elevators run up to the observation platform on the highest point of the arch. You can also view the arch from the water on one of the many riverboat cruises, or by air in a helicopter tour. Tickets for the Gateway Arch are sold at the Gateway Arch Ticketing and Visitor Center in the Old Courthouse, which is located eight blocks (a 10-15 minute walk) from the arch. Advance purchase of tickets for the observation platform is recommended.

2. Old Courthouse

On the right-hand side of Market Street is a massive domed building, the Old Courthouse, which is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Park. It was built in the mid 1800s and has been the scene of several important trials, including the suit by Dred Scott for freedom from slavery and Suffragist Virginia Louisa Minor for the right to vote. The courthouse now showcases exhibits from the Museum of Westward Expansion. The Gateway Arch Ticketing and Visitor Center is also located in the Old Courthouse.

3. Missouri Botanical Garden

The beautiful Missouri Botanical Garden is also known as the Shaw Garden, after the businessman and botanist Henry Shaw (1800-89) who laid it out in 1859. In the southeast part of the gardens are the richly appointed Tower Grove House, Henry Shaw's "garden house". The gardens themselves comprise a lovely rose garden, the rather unusual Climatron, built in 1960 for tropical plants, a Japanese Garden, an "aqua-tunnel" under a water-lily pool, and a herbarium.

The Doris I. Schnuck Children's Garden is designed with youngsters in mind, with an aim towards educating and inspiring children in the field of horticulture. Within the garden are several tourist attractions, including a prairie village and treehouse. Special exhibits include the "Cave Experience," which is a man-made cave, and a wetlands area that includes a steamboat.

4. Forest Park Attractions

Forest Park sits on the site of the 1904 World Fair, and some of the structures here still date from that time period. The Jefferson Memorial sits on the north side of the park and houses the Missouri History Museum, which includes historical exhibits about the state, St. Louis, and Charles Lindbergh. In the center of the park, the City Art Museum has collections of art from prehistoric through contemporary works. Across the lawn, more than 6,500 animals call the 90-acre St. Louis Zoo their home. Residents include Asian elephants, hippos, gorillas, tree kangaroos, jaguars, and sea lions. To the east, near the Highlands Golf and Tennis Center, the Jewel Box contains a conservatory with hundreds of varieties of flowers. Beyond this, on the outside corner of the park, the St. Louis Science Center has plenty of attractions and things to do, including a planetarium, IMAX theater, and interactive exhibits for all ages.

5. Magic House, St. Louis Children's Museum

Located in a three-story Victorian home, the Magic House museum provides hands-on exhibits about science, communications, and computers. Exhibits are divided into themed areas and encourage engagement from children. Each area is designed to enhance curiosity and experimentation. There is a designated play area for babies and toddlers, as well as the Calming Corner, a room filled with activities and toys that are soothing, which is a haven for children who need a break from sensory overload. The museum café specializes in healthy fresh-food options; many of the ingredients are grown on-site.

6. City Museum

The City Museum, housed in a former shoe factory, is a delightfully entertaining facility that both children and adults will appreciate. Exhibits include a giant aquarium, architectural museum, art activities, participatory circus, and oddities, among many others. The museum's major structures and installations were made entirely of materials found within the St. Louis municipal area. The building itself is an impressive piece of architecture, and its design is the brainchild of sculptor and artist Bob Cassilly.

7. Market Street

Across the I 70, beside the Gateway Arch, is the start of Market Street. The city's main street, it is lined by important buildings and halfway along opens out into St. Louis Memorial Plaza. On the left-hand side is the gigantic rotunda of the Busch Stadium, which has seating for 50,000 spectators. The stadium is home to the St. Louis Cardinals, the city's baseball team, whose history is documented in the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame. The neighboring National Bowling Hall of Fame does the same for bowling.

8. Old Cathedral (Basilica of St. Louis, King)

Southwest of the Gateway Arch is the Old Cathedral, the Catholic Basilica of St. Louis of France. Built from 1831 to 1834 on the site of the first church of St. Louis (1770), it survived the 1849 fire unscathed. On the west side of the cathedral is the Old Cathedral Museum, covering the history of the city. The interior of the church is decorated with complex mosaics, and ongoing restoration projects have returned the dome and bell towers to their original glory.

9. Scott Joplin House

Scott Joplin, the "father of Ragtime," lived in this house from 1901 to 1903. Maintained by Missouri State Parks, the house is furnished in period to the early 1900s and includes memorabilia and a player piano featuring the artist's music. Interpretive programs and tours are available to visitors.

10. Campbell House Museum

Built in 1851, this three story townhouse has been accurately restored with its carriage house, rose garden, and gazebo, offers a showcase of Victorian furnishings and decorative arts. Campbell House Museum features original furnishings from the family who lived here from 1854 through 1938. The museum collection includes classic Rococo-Revival Victorian furniture, portraits, textiles, silver, gold-leaf frames and cornices, faux-grained woodwork, and other examples of decorative arts.